Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory



Featured R&D — Director’s Initiatives

The Laboratory invests in a broad range of science, technology, and engineering, with focus shifting as adjustments are made in the Laboratory's missions and as new, game-changing breakthroughs are made in mission-relevant ST&E. Several areas, identified as Director’s Initiatives, are the focus of special attention to enhance or create new core competencies to meet emerging mission needs. These areas include:

Accelerated Materials and Manufacturing. The ongoing revolution in manufacturing will have an impact on every aspect of society over the coming decades. Lawrence Livermore is investing heavily in accelerated materials and manufacturing, including additive manufacturing — both nonmetallic and metallic. By combining unique Laboratory expertise in these technologies with our heritage of predictive computational models, we seek to lead the development of manufacturing processes with short- and long-term impact on our national security missions.

Data Science. Lawrence Livermore has been a leader in high-performance computing since its founding 60 years ago — a tradition that continues with some of the world's fastest supercomputers. Building on those capabilities, the Laboratory is investing in the science and technology needed to handle the mammoth data sets whose sheer size is presenting an ever greater challenge in all enterprises. The Laboratory's investment strategy in this area is broad and includes both a hardware component and a capability development, leveraging the Laboratory's proximity to many of the leaders in this emerging discipline.

Bioengineering. The Laboratory has a strong program in biotechnology, having developed devices such as the artificial retina and a broad range of nanofluidic devices. The initiative seeks to combine a number of technologies developed over the past decade to put organ prototypes — actual living tissue — on a silicon device to study in vivo processes in an entirely new way. The goal is to develop an integrated, physiologically relevant human model as an experimental test bed for more rapid development of medical countermeasures.