Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory



Major Scientific Awards

This page lists major scientific awards received in recent years for work conducted while the recipients were at LLNL.

 

Nobel Prize

2007

The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was jointly awarded to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and to former U.S. Vice President Al Gore for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about manmade climate change and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change. More than 40 LLNL employees were key scientific contributors to the IPCC work that was cited by the Nobel Committee, primarily scientists with LLNL's Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison.

 

National Medal of Science

2009

Berni Alder. Retired LLNL physicist Berni Alder received this honor "for establishing powerful computer methods useful for molecular dynamics simulations, conceiving and executing experimental shock-wave simulations to obtain properties of fluids and solids at very high pressures, and developing Monte Carlo methods for calculating the properties of matter from first principles, all of which contributed to major achievements in the science of condensed matter."

 

 

Gordon Bell Prizes

2015

LLNL's Sequoia supercomputer played a key role in an Earth mantle convection simulation by a University of Texas-led team that won the 2015 Gordon Bell Prize. The team's peak performance results were achieved on the full Sequoia system last summer, and the weak and strong scaling results figured prominently in the team's presentation at the SC15 conference in Austin, Texas.

2013

A record-setting simulation run on the Sequoia supercomputer was awarded the Gordon Bell Prize in the peak performance category. Using a record number of 6.4 million threads on Livermore's IBM BlueGene/Q machine, the fluid dynamics simulation of cloud cavitation collapse employed 13 trillion cells—making it the largest simulation ever in fluid dynamics—and achieved a computational speed of 14.4 petaflops (73% of Sequoia's theoretical peak).

2007

The 2007 Gordon Bell Prize was awarded in recognition of a "first-of-a-kind simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in molten metals on BlueGene/L." The winning entry, entitled "Extending Stability Beyond CPU Millennium: A Micron-Scale Simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability," was submitted by a team led by LLNL's Fred Streitz. The team included Jim Glosli, Kyle Caspersen, David Richards, and Robert Rudd from the Laboratory and John Gunnels of IBM.

2006

The 2006 Gordon Bell Prize for Peak Performance was awarded to the "Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations of High-Z Metals on the BlueGene/L Platform" team of Francois Gygi, (UC, Davis and LLNL), Erik W. Draeger, Martin Schulz, and Bronis R. de Supinski of LLNL, plus collaborators from IBM, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Vienna University of Technology.

A 2006 Gordon Bell Prize for Special Achievement was awarded to "The BlueGene/L Supercomputer and Quantum Chromodynamics" project team, which included Ron Soltz from LLNL and a team from IBM Research.

 

Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers

2016

Tammy Ma. Ma was recognized for her "innovation and leadership in quantifying hydrodynamic instability mix in the hot spot of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF); key contributions to experiments demonstrating fusion fuel gains exceeding unity; and broad educational outreach and service to the scientific community."

Jonathan Hopkins. Much of the work on design and fabrication of advanced flexible structures, mechanisms, and materials honored by this award was initiated while Prof. Hopkins was an LLNL postdoc. Hopkins was nominated for this award by LLNL and is now an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

2014

Miguel Morales-Silva. Miguel's award recognized his research on first-principles descriptions of materials at high pressure and temperature using density functional theory and quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

2011

Heather Whitley. For her work using path-integral Monte Carlo techniques to produce very accurate quantum statistical potentials for use in molecular dynamic codes, for applying these methods to first-principles understanding of thermal conductivity in ignition capsules for the National Ignition Facility, and for service to the laboratory Postdoctoral Association.

Jeffrey Banks. For his work in computational physics, scientific computation, and numerical analysis, especially pioneering contributions in numerical approximations to hyperbolic partial differential equations focusing on the development and analysis of nonlinear and high-resolution finite-volume and finite-difference methods, and for service in high schools and the scientific community.

2010

Tina Chow. For fundamental research on the simulation of atmospheric turbulence, which has wide-ranging applications, including the dispersal of plumes resulting from atmospheric releases of radioactive or toxic material and the accurate simulation of wind fields for weather prediction. (Award won while on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley.)

Gang Logan Liu. For collaborative development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy techniques for a variety of national security applications ranging from measuring the long-term health of the U.S. nuclear stockpile to biodetection. (Award won while on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.)

Greg Bronevetsky. For innovative, cutting-edge research using statistical models to predict the effects of system faults leading to the development of new software tools and more reliable applications and supercomputer systems, and for his strong track record of professional service and leadership.

2009

Gianluca Iaccarino. For his extensive and deep scientific contributions in the areas of turbulent flow and uncertainty quantifications and quantified margins of uncertainty, which are amplified for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) community through his position of intellectual leadership at the NNSA Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Center at Stanford. (Nominated by LLNL in recognition for his collaborations with the Laboratory.)

2008

Lynford Goddard. For his innovative research in building high-speed chip-seal monolithic photonic systems that contribute to device design, modeling, and fabrication, as well as the characterization of novel semiconductor materials. (Worked as a postdoctoral researcher at LLNL before winning the award.)

2006

Shawn Newsam. For outstanding research in image processing, pattern recognition, and data mining, and for his leading role in educating young scientists and engineers by developing a new and innovative academic program in computer science and engineering.

Jeff Kysar. For fundamental research into the deformation of materials under high-rate loading, including development of mechanistic models of microstructure and material fracture evolution for the Stockpile Stewardship Program.

Carlos Pantano-Rubino. For innovative development of computational turbulence models and advanced simulations of turbulent flows, contributions to the theory of laminar flames, and the statistical modeling of flame-hole dynamics.

Michael A. Zingale. For advancing the detailed simulation of turbulent combustion and demonstrating parallel, multiphysics methods used in national security applications, for pioneering collaborations with fellow researchers, and for training students in computational astrophysics.

 

E. O. Lawrence Awards

2013

Stephen C. Myers. LLNL seismologist Stephen C. Myers was recognized in the National Security and Nonproliferation category for his work on developing seismic monitoring technologies to locate nuclear explosions. Stephen was cited for his leadership in developing the Regional Seismic Travel Time Model and Computing Code, a collaborative effort involving Livermore, Sandia, and Los Alamos National Laboratories and the Air Force Technical Application Center.

Siegfried H. Glenzer. Former LLNL scientist Siegfried H. Glenzer, an 18-year Lab veteran who joined the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in 2012, was recognized in the Fusion and Plasma Sciences category for his work on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). He and his collaborators were among the first to perform experiments there, beginning with NIF's early light in 2004 and including full-scale inertial confinement fusion hohlraum experiments from 2008 to 2010.

2011

Thomas P. Guilderson. Biological and Environmental Sciences: For his ground-breaking radiocarbon measurements of corals, advancements in understanding the paleohistory of ocean currents and ocean processes revealing past climate variability, and the elucidation of how physical and biogeochemical oceanic processes affect the global carbon cycle.

2009

Omar Hurricane. National Security: For his scientific leadership to advance understanding in a long-standing nuclear weapons physics anomaly and his contribution to nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship.

 

National Nuclear Security Administration's Science and Technology Award

2012

Michel McCoy. His pioneering work in high-performance computing established Lawrence Livermore as a world-renowned supercomputing center. He was honored in 2012 with the first-ever National Nuclear Security Administration's Science and Technology Award.

 

Elections to the National Academy of Sciences

2011

Benjamin D. Santer. LLNL physicist and atmospheric scientistwas elected for his for his research in human-induced climate change.

2008

Claire E. Max. Long-time LLNL employee (now a professor of astronomy and astrophysics and director of the Center for Adaptive Optics at UC Santa Cruz).

2001

Former LLNL employee Charles R. Alcock was elected for his innovative work on astrophysical surveys, much of which was conducted while at LLNL.

1999

Former LLNL Deputy Director for S&T Cherry A. Murray was cited for fundamental studies in surface and condensed-matter physics, especially using light scattering and imaging. She has done seminal work on order–disorder transitions in colloidal systems and Raman scattering from very small monodisperse silicon clusters. This honor came while she was employed at Lucent Technologies.

 

Elections to the National Academy of Engineering

2009

Edward I. Moses was cited "for outstanding scientific and engineering leadership of the National Ignition Facility."

2007

John O. Hallquist. President of the Livermore Software Technology Corp. and former LLNL employee. Dr. Hallquist was cited "for the development of explicit nonlinear finite-element methods and their worldwide dissemination in the DYNA family of programs." Dr. Hallquist created the original code in the DYNA family (DYNA3D) and various successor codes while he was working on the LLNL weapons program.

2005

Former LLNL Deputy Director for S&T Jeffrey Wadsworth left the lab just 3 years before his election to the Academy "for research on high-temperature materials, superplasticity, and ancient steels and for leadership in national defense and science programs." Much of this work was done while he was at LLNL.

2002

Former LLNL Deputy Director for S&T Cherry A. Murray for seminal work on order–disorder transitions in colloidal systems, and for leadership in bringing new concepts from research to production. At the time of her election, she worked at Lucent Technologies.

 

Hans A. Bethe Prize

2007

James R. Wilson. Awarded the 2007 Hans A. Bethe Prize by the American Physical Society for "his work in nuclear astrophysics and numerical work on supernovae core collapse, neutrino transport, and shock propagation. His codes reenergized supernovae shocks and launched numerical relativity and magnetically driven jets."

 

John Dawson Award of Excellence in Plasma Physics

2012

A team led by LLNL researchers was selected "for predicting and demonstrating the technique of laser scatter on self-generated plasma-optics gratings that enables generation and redirection of high-energy laser beams important for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion and high-power laser–matter interactions." The team comprised Robert Kirkwood (LLNL), Debra Callahan (LLNL), Laurent Divol (LLNL), George Kyrala (Los Alamos National Laboratory), Nathan Meezan (LLNL), and Pierre Michel (LLNL).

2006

Max Tabak and Scott Wilks were cited "for developing the fast ignition inertial fusion concept and for demonstrating key aspects of it in a series of experiments that have catalyzed the world-wide effort on the concept." They shared the award with Kazuo Tanaka of Osaka University and Peter Norreys of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

 

James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics

2007

John Lindl. "For 30 years of continuous plasma physics contributions in high-energy-density physics and inertial confinement fusion research and scientific management."

 

James B. Macelwane Medal

2010

David B. Lobell

2008

James Badro. Honored by the American Geophysical Union for "significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability." He did much of the work for which he was cited while at LLNL.

 

Edward Teller Award

2013

James Hammer. A Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was selected as the 2013 Teller Award winner for his "outstanding, innovative research in inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics using both high-powered lasers and Z-pinch machines." Among many credits, Dr. Hammer is a co-inventor of the fast-ignition approach to nuclear fusion energy.

2011

Bruce Remington

2009

Edward Moses

2005

Max Tabak

 

Fusion Power Associates Awards

2015

Susana Reyes, Excellence in Fusion Engineering Award. This award recognizes the leadership that Susana has provided to both magnetic and inertial fusion efforts in many areas, including safety and licensing, tritium systems and power plant designs.

Wayne Meier, Special Award. This award recognizes Wayne's contributions to advancing the science, technology, and integrated assessments of potential fusion power plants, and for hjs broad support of the fusion community in leadership positions within the ANS and IEEE.

John Edwards, Leadership Award. John was awarded for his many scientific contributions and his managerial leadership provided to national and international research efforts on inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density plasma physics. The award notes especially his leadership of the scientific program on the National Ignition Facility for both high-energy-density physics and for the eventual achievement of ignition, leading toward a commercial fusion power source.

2011

Mike Dunne (Excellence in Fusion Engineering)

2010

Dmitri Ryutov (Distinguished Career Award)

Pravesh Patel (Excellence in Fusion Engineering)

Chris Keane (Special Awards)

2009

Jeffrey Latkowski (Excellence in Fusion Engineering)

2008

Edward Moses (Leadership Award)

Richard Post (Special Awards)

John Nuckolls (Special Awards)

2007

David Baldwin (Distinguished Career Award)

Brian Worth (Excellence in Fusion Engineering>

 

Fulbright Distinguished Scholar

2009

Arthur J. Rodgers, Jr.

Panayot S. Vassilevski

 

Joseph Weber Award - American Astronomical Society

2014

Claire Max. Claire Max, an astrophysicist at Livermore and a faculty member at UC Santa Cruz, earned the Joseph Weber Award for Astronomical Instrumentation from the American Astronomical Society for her adaptive optics (AO) work.

Newton International Fellowship

2015

Matthew Levy. Matthew Levy, a Lawrence Scholar at LLNL, was awarded the prestigious Newton International Fellowship by the Royal Society of the United Kingdom (UK). As a Newton Fellow, Levy's research will involve devising new ways to harness strong electromagnetic fields comprising high-power laser light to test aspects of the nonlinear quantum vacuum in the laboratory. Commenting on the importance of continuing to collaborate with physicists at LLNL, Levy says, "An essential goal of the Newton Fellows is to enhance ties and collaborations between the UK and countries around world."

Lifetime Achievement Award - American Society for Precision Engineering

2014

Steve Patterson is a former LLNL Associate Director for Engineering. Patterson received this honor for his contributions to precision machine design, diamond-turning machine control, and ultraprecision dimensional measurement.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prizes

Henry Chapman. This important research award in Germany honors outstanding scientists. Henry Chapman receives the 2.5-Million-Euro prize for his pioneering work in the development of femtosecond crystallography. It enables the decoding of complex biomolecule structures in their native configuration with the help of X-ray lasers. The femtosecond crystallography methods that lead to this award were originally pioneered by Henry and his colleagues at LLNL with funding from the LDRD program.

DOE Secretarial Honor Award

2015

David Bader was presented with the DOE Secretarial Honor Award in recognition of his leadership of the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project.

Distinguished Achievement Award — Department of Energy

2015

Kambiz Salari was recognized the impact of his aerodynamics research. He has led the Vehicle Systems Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Project for almost 20 years, and his work underpins commercial drag reduction technologies for long-haul trucks.

Edouard Fabre Prize

2015

Pierre Michel received the 2015 Edouard Fabre Prize awarded by the European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST) for his pioneering research into energy transfer between crossing laser beams in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraums. Michel was selected based on his contributions to studying the physics of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and physics of laser-produced plasmas.

Early Career National Hispanic Scientist of the Year Award

2015

Miguel Morales-Silva. This award honors annually the achievements of an early career scientist with well-established and highly respected accomplishments in science, technology, engineering, art, or math (STEAM) disciplines. Morales-Silva received this award in recognition of his studies of the electronic structure of materials using density-functional theory and quantum Monte Carlo methods.

Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal - American Chemical Society

2016

Annie Kersting. This medal, awarded by the American Chemical Society (ACS), recognizes outstanding scientific achievement, leadership, and service to chemistry by women and is a national award open to all chemists who are citizens of the U.S. Kersting received this award for her seminal contributions to understanding radionuclide behavior in the environment, mentoring students and postdocs, and developing successful education programs in nuclear forensics and environmental radiochemistry.

Alameda County Women's Hall of Fame

2014

Natalia Zaitseva. Natalia Zaitseva, a Lawrence Livermore physicist, was recently inducted into the Alameda County Women's Hall of Fame. Zaitseva was recognized for her work in science, technology, and engineering.

Zaitseva developed a method for growing extremely large crystals more quickly than had ever been achieved before. Though many scientists were skeptical that the process would prove successful, she demonstrated that crystals from solution could be grown 10 to 100 times more quickly than by traditional methods. She perfected the crystal-growing process after arriving at Livermore in 1993. This work has been important for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which will advance national security, energy research, and basic physics research. In addition, Zaitseva co-led a Livermore research team that in 2012 developed the first plastic material capable of efficiently distinguishing neutrons from gamma rays.

2012

Dawn Shaughnessy. Under her leadership, a team of scientists has discovered six new elements on the periodic table - the heaviest elements found to date. She recently led a group that named the newest heavy element to be accepted into the periodic table — Livermorium — in honor of the Lab and its host city of Livermore. In addition to her research, Dawn thrives on getting young people interested in science. Her team recently received a $5,000 grant and donated it to the Livermore High School chemistry department. The gift grew from Dawn's memories of working in poorly equipped chemistry classes in high school.

2011

Crystal Jaing. A central player in developing an award-winning technology that will provide new tools to detect bioterrorism attacks, diagnose disease, and verify product safety. The technology, known as the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA), allows for the detection of any bacteria or virus on a tested sample within 24 hours. The technology relies on 388,000 tiny probes that fit in the middle of a one-by-three-inch glass slide. LLMDA has been evaluated for use by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and is the subject of interest from 15 companies worldwide examining the technology's potential as a product safety tool.

2010

Lisa Poyneer. An engineer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory who is instrumental in the development of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which will be the world's most powerful optical instrument of its kind once it is completed. The instrument will survey stars and take direct images of faraway planets about which little is known. Lisa's research was essential in winning the $24 million contract to pay for the GPI's development. Using algorithms she developed, the GPI promises a performance level that is up to 100 times greater than current instruments of its kind.

2009

Gina Bonanno. A senior technical manager at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Dr. Bonanno is a central player in one of the nation's biggest and most exciting scientific projects: the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The recently completed facility promises to open new avenues for exploring the power of fusion energy. The NIF uses 192 giant laser beams to demonstrate the fusion energy process that provides the life-giving energy of the sun. The experiments hold the hope of unlocking access to a never-ending source of clean energy. Since 2005, Gina has been Program Manager and Deputy Director of the National Ignition Campaign, the $1.6 billion program to demonstrate fusion ignition on the NIF. Gina is part of Lawrence Livermore's senior management team and is active in many of the Lab's community outreach efforts.

2008

Pam Hullinger. As a youngster growing up five blocks away from the Santa Anita Race Track, Pam dreamed of being a veterinarian. That dream led her to LLNL, where as the Laboratory's Chief Veterinary Officer she is a national leader in efforts to prevent the introduction and spread of foreign animal diseases. Pam's expertise brought her to the front lines of the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Great Britain in 2001. She also played an important role in working to contain equine West Nile disease in California. At the Livermore lab, Pam has been closely involved in the development of a rapid test to detect foot-and-mouth and six other livestock diseases, which could save large numbers of animals and significantly reduce costs to U.S. agriculture.

2007

Hope Ishii. A researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory who is one of a handful of scientists to get first crack of examining cosmic dust collected by NASA's Stardust mission. The particles collected by NASA's Stardust spacecraft hold the hope of unlocking mysteries about the origins of our solar system. Hope, a Pleasanton resident, earned a bachelor's degree in materials science and engineering from Cornell University, a master's degree in physics and engineering projects from Chalmers University Technology in Sweden, and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Stanford University.

2005

Dona Crawford. Livermore's Associate Director for Computation, Dona was honored for her work and her leadership in establishing the world's then-fastest supercomputer, Blue Gene/L, at LLNL. In her position, she is responsible for the development and deployment of integrated computing and information resources by the Computation Directorate, which through her technical skills and leadership has sustained its global preeminence in high-performance computing.

 

R&D 100 Awards

Each year R&D Magazine selects their list of the 100 most technically significant new products and publishes them as their list of R&D 100 Awards. Entries come from private industry, government agencies, universities, and research institutes throughout the world. Winners are chosen by the magazine's editors together with a panel of experts chosen from a variety of relevant disciplines. Over the years, the R&D 100 Awards have been given to products such as Polacolor film (1963), the flashcube (1965), the automated teller machine (1973), the halogen lamp (1974), the fax machine (1975), the liquid crystal display (1980), the touch-sensitive screen and the color graphics printer (1986), the Kodak Photo DC (1991), the Nicoderm antismoking patch (1992), the digital compact cassette (1993), Taxol anticancer drug (1993), and the Power Beat automotive battery (1994), each of which went on to become outstanding commercial success stories.

In 2015, the Laboratory was honored with three R&D 100 Awards. These  new winners brings to 155 the total number of these prestigious awards won by LLNL. A complete listing of LLNL technologies that have received R&D 100 awards is published by IPO.