A Look Back

W. Lawrence Gates, the chief scientist and first leader of LLNL’s PCMDI.
// A Look Back

The end of World War II heralded an era of population growth throughout the nation and especially in the State of California, where many returning soldiers and their families settled.

Livermore mechanical technicians pose in front of the gas recirculation plant they built, December 1967​​​​​​.​
// A Look Back

On Dec. 10, 1967, Project Gasbuggy was conducted in a sandstone gas-bearing formation in the San Juan Basin near Farmington, New Mexico.

Teller and Reagan
// A Look Back

In 1967, Ronald Reagan, former movie star and then newly-elected governor of California, visited the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore, California to tour the facility and become more informed about major ongoing projects, including work on national defense.

B&W photo of men walking at Nevada Test Site
// A Look Back
On Sept. 19, 1957, the University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore detonated the first contained underground nuclear explosion, “Rainier,” into a long tunnel beneath a high mesa in the northwest corner of the Nevada Test Site.
Two men looking at screens
// A Look Back
In 1981, a select group of U.S. Army officers visited Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to ​​​​​​​participate in a series of nuclear wargames unlike any conducted.
Livermore physicist Nicholas Christofilos describes Operation Argus.
// A Look Back
In 1958, the United States conducted a set of nuclear tests, codenamed ARGUS, to determine whether they could interfere with communications and weapons performance.
Artist's conception of a nuclear-excavated canal
// A Look Back
“Project Dugout” was intended to explore the use of nuclear explosives for large-scale earth excavation projects, such as the creation of harbors and canals.
Harold Brown (right) and Edward Teller
// A Look Back
Physicist, former Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Director Harold Brown left an indelible mark
Underground cavity formed by nuclear explosion
// A Look Back
The Atomic Energy Commission established the Plowshare Program in June 1957 to explore the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.
Moving a massive magnet across Laboratory grounds in 1981
// A Look Back

Over a busy weekend in early May 1981, a method used by the ancient Egyptians to build the pyramids was used to move a massive piece of 20th century technology across the Lab grounds.