A Look Back

Rib cage attached to the soluble organ cavity mold and positioned inside the hollow torso silicone mold.
// A Look Back
Livermore researchers construct three realistic torso-only manikins to aid with radiation measurement.
Man stanading next to large scientific equipment
// A Look Back
The discovery of carbon-14 leads to accelerator mass spectrometry at Livermore.
Man sitting at typewriter on left, woman, seated, on right.
// A Look Back
Artificial intelligence research begins at Lawrence Livermore.
One man sitting in experimental automobile frame, another standing next to it
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In 1980, LLNL researchers worked on a powered roadway for electric vehicles that they hoped would change the face of the nation’s transportation system.
B&W photo of Richard Post sitting next to giant magnet
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Livermore began investigating controlled thermonuclear reactions and fusion early in its history
 A photo from 1970 showing Marvin Van Dilla working with flow cytometry.
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In 1963, a comprehensive, long-range program dealing with the sources and biological effects of human-made radiation was established by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore.

W. Lawrence Gates, the chief scientist and first leader of LLNL’s PCMDI.
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The end of World War II heralded an era of population growth throughout the nation and especially in the State of California, where many returning soldiers and their families settled.

From left: George Russell, Harold Brown and Edward Teller.
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In the summer of 1956, a U.S. Navy-sponsored study (Project Nobska) on anti-submarine warfare was held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Carl Haussmann and John Emmett, working on lasers in 1973.
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Sixty years ago in 1960, at Hughes Aircraft Company in Malibu, California, Thomas Maiman fired his solid-state ruby laser, emitting humankind’s first coherent visible light.

Members of the nuclear clean-up crew at work near Thule Air Base, 1968.
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On Jan. 21, 1968, an aircraft accident involving a United States Air Force B-52 bomber occurred near Thule Air Base in the Danish territory of Greenland.