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Nanocarbon condensate
// S&T Highlights
An LLNL team has proven that nanocarbon can be synthesized by applying strong shocks to an organic material.
Stars in the constellation Carina
// S&T Highlights
Micrometer-sized silicon carbide stardust grains extracted from the Murchison meteorite formed anywhere from 1.5 million to 3 billion years before the formation of our solar system.
People holding award plaque
// Recognition
Former Secretary of Energy Rick Perry recognized Livermore staff with six Secretary’s Honor Awards at a ceremony at Department of Energy headquarters.
Five scientists work on CubeSat
// S&T Highlights
Livermore’s first in-house designed and fabricated CubeSat went into orbit in December.
Clouds
// S&T Highlights
With better representation of clouds, the latest generation of global climate models predict more warming in response to increasing carbon dioxide than their predecessors.
Man receiving award from woman
// Recognition
In recognition of more than 40 years of service to the U.S. Air Force, Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration, Tom Gioconda, who recently stepped down as deputy director of the Lab, has been awarded the NNSA Administrator’s Gold Medal.
Several people look at computer screen
// Recognition
A wargame developed by University of California, Berkeley students, with a helping hand from Lawrence Livermore and Sandia national laboratories researchers, won first place at an international conference.
Three researchers in front of U.S. map and turbine
// S&T Highlights
A trio of Livermore scientists have served as co-authors for three separate papers about projects they’ve worked on to upgrade wind power forecasting for the nation.
Three scientists looking at Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope
// S&T Highlights
A multi-institutional research team has successfully obtained the first nanoscale video of copper deforming under extremely high strain rates.
Scientist holds chip-based platform
// S&T Highlights
Lawrence Livermore researchers are one step closer to recapitulating the brain’s response to both biochemical and mechanical cues in a chip-based platform.