Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory (AML) is a new 14,000-square-foot facility where Lawrence Livermore scientists and engineers are working side-by-side with partners to develop new materials and technologies. AML brings together science and engineering expertise, leading-edge technology, academic partners, and industry experience under one roof. The facility is located “outside the fence”—physically outside LLNL’s fence on the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC). This placement frees industry partner personnel from obtaining security access to work within Livermore boundaries, facilitating collaboration and communication.

The AML will house some of the most sophisticated and capable equipment in the field of advanced/additive manufacturing, some of which are not yet commercially available. AML’s facilities will include equipment for direct ink writing, powder bed fusion, electrophoretic deposition, projection microstereolithography, and laser-based processes such as two-photon lithography and selective laser melting. Additional resources will include material evaluation and characterization equipment, access to high-performance computing (HPC) modeling and simulation capabilities, and manufacturing systems from several active LLNL research programs.

With these capabilities, partners can develop new materials and components for any sector—for example, transportation, defense, energy, biomedicine. Research and development at AML will result in technologies that Livermore can use to advance its national security missions and its partners can turn into products and services for the marketplace, a process called “spin-in/spin-out technology development.”

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hollow lattice structures built on LLNL’s Large Area Projection Microstereolithography platform
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The AML houses some of the most sophisticated and capable equipment in the field of advanced/additive manufacturing

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hollow lattice structures built on LLNL’s Large Area Projection Microstereolithography platform