Science and Technology Highlights

Optical fibers against blue background
// S&T Highlights
Scientists at the Laboratory have worked with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and U.S. Navy laboratories on the Tactical Undersea Network Architectures, or TUNA, initiative.
Europium, a rare earth element with the same relative hardness of lead
// S&T Highlights
To help increase the U.S. supply of rare earth metals, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory team has created a new way to recover rare earths using bioengineered bacteria.
Illustration of laser beams driving an indirect plasma shock wave through the reservoir consisting of a beryllium ablator
// S&T Highlights
Livermore researchers are applying additive manufacturing processes to generate specific nanoporous structures.
A visualization of homogeneous nucleation
// S&T Highlights
Livermore scientists study material phase transitions at extreme conditions.
science image
// S&T Highlights
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be part of a multi-lab effort to apply high-performance computing to U.S.-based industry's discovery, design, and development of materials for severe environments.
Lunar landscape composite image
// S&T Highlights
Livermore scientists unravel the history of the solar system through cosmochemistry.
Computer-aided design models show how the micromirrors are configured.
// S&T Highlights
Livermore engineers develop an array of thousands of constantly moving hexagonal mirrors, each measuring just 1 millimeter square.
image of researchers holding 4D printed material
// S&T Highlights
For the first time, Livermore researchers have successfully 3D printed composite silicone materials that are flexible, stretchable and possess shape memory behavior.
The Wolter optic
// S&T Highlights
Livermore researchers are working to adapt the specialized optics used in orbiting x-ray telescopes to provide high-resolution images of man-made x-ray sources here on Earth.
Artist conception of diamond rain falling in giant planet
// S&T Highlights
Scientists have observed “diamond rain” for the first time as it formed under extremely high pressure.