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Varied colors of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) displays,
// S&T Highlights
Livermore researchers are perfecting a technology called reversible electrophoretic deposition for high-contrast wearable displays.
A schematic illustration of a 3D nanometer-thin membrane
// S&T Highlights
Mimicking the structure of the kidney, a team has created a three-dimensional nanometer-thin membrane that breaks the permeance-selectivity trade-off of artificial membranes.
Frustraum hohlraum design
// S&T Highlights
Initial NIF experiments using a full-scale version of the Frustraum hohlraum have produced nearly round inertial confinement fusion implosions and more laser-induced energy absorption.
Energy flow chart
// S&T Highlights
Livermore has updated its energy flow charts to include state-by-state energy use for 2015-2018.
Artist's conception of Synchrotron X-ray beam impinging upon ionic liquid molecules
// S&T Highlights
Livermore scientists coupled X-ray experiments with high-fidelity simulations to investigate a widely used family of ionic liquids confined in carbon nanopores typically used in supercapacitors.
Composite image of melting glacier
// S&T Highlights
The most advanced and comprehensive analysis of climate sensitivity undertaken has revealed with more confidence than ever how sensitive the Earth’s climate is to carbon dioxide.
LLNL physicist Yuan Shi
// Recognition
Livermore physicist Yuan Shi has earned the American Physical Society’s Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis award for his work in plasma physics.
Three physicists
// Recognition
Three scientists from Livermore are recipients of the 2020 John Dawson Award for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research from the American Physical Society.
Report cover
// Recognition
The National Ignition Facility is highlighted in a recent assessment of the state and future of plasma science by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
Artist's conception of lanmodulin protein
// S&T Highlights
Researchers have designed a new process, based on a naturally occurring protein, that could extract and purify rare earth elements (REE) from low-grade sources.