Science and Technology Highlights

Artist's conception of gravity waves spiralling out from black hole
// S&T Highlights
A research team has dveloped a machine learning-based technique capable of automatically deriving a mathematical model for the motion of binary black holes from raw gravitational wave data.
Man in bunny suit holding metal part
// S&T Highlights
Third in a series of articles describing aspects of the National Ignition Facility’s record-breaking 1.3-megajoule experiment.
Flames consume a home
// S&T Highlights
Research shows that two-thirds of the increase in vapor pressure deficit, an indication of fire weather, in the western United States is due to human-caused climate change.
Image of the sun
// S&T Highlights
First in a series of articles describing aspects of the National Ignition Facility’s record-breaking 1.3-megajoule experiment.
Large arrows and text
// S&T Highlights
Second in a series of articles describing aspects of the National Ignition Facility’s record-breaking 1.3-megajoule experiment.
A salmon jumping from river
// S&T Highlights
A Multi-institutional team of researchers found that late-migrating fish that spend a year in their home streams as juveniles leave in the fall and arrive in the ocean larger and more likely to survive their years at sea.
Subnanoscale reversible alane cluster—molecular diagram
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Researchers are exploring the use of metal hydrides to reversibly release and uptake hydrogen under mild conditions.
Optical microscopic image of a 3D-printed carbon log-pile
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Livermore scientists have created nanostrut-connected tube-in-tubes that enable stronger low-density structural materials.
Simulation of a computationally designed antibody with colorful ribbons of proten strands
// S&T Highlights
Livermore has joined the international Human Vaccines Project to accelerate vaccine development and understanding of immune response.
A cutaway drawing of an ASML EUVL machine. Credit: ASML
// S&T Highlights
The microprocessors at the heart of an increasing number of the world’s newest mobile phones and personal computers were made possible in part by Livermore research.